Accounts and Logins [OYF #4]

Now that your paperwork is organized, and you have a system for filing things going forward, it’s time for the next step: making a list of accounts.

This might be a bit tedious, but it should be fairly easy (since you organized your paperwork already).

I want you to make a list of all of your financial accounts, and all important information associated with it.

You will want the name of the financial institution, the type of account, who owns the account (you or your spouse), the account number, the website where you can log in, the login ID, phone number, payment due date, and any other information you think is important to have handy.

I’ve created a spreadsheet you can use to organize the information:

Account Information Spreadsheet

Feel free to add or remove rows depending on your situation!

** There are some other sheets attached to the account information spreadsheet, don’t worry about those yet! We’ll be using those later on.

Now I know this will probably seem tedious, but having this information all in one place will be so helpful.

Having this spreadsheet is great if you have a spouse that isn’t “in charge” of the finances they can use this spreadsheet to find whatever information they need in case something happens.

But really it’s just great to have in general.

Once you have the spreadsheet filled out, just double check to make sure you have all of your accounts. 

Here are some of the accounts you may have that should be included in the spreadsheet:

  • Checking 
  • Savings 
  • Certificates of deposit
  • Money market
  • Credit cards 
  • Car loans
  • Mortgage
  • Personal loans
  • Student loans
  • Brokerage accounts
  • 401(k)’s
  • IRA’s

Okay you have all the account information in one place?

Good!

The last thing you need to do for today is to create a reminder for your payment due dates.

You can create an alert on your phone’s calendar, or you can use a paper calendar.

I’ve included a monthly calendar printable that you can use each month to write down when payments are due (and when your Money Day is!).

That wasn’t so bad, was it?